Over the years, USS San Diego has obtained considerable damage. As she sank, San Diego capsized and rolled completely upside down. Everything from her boat deck up is now either crushed or buried in massive amounts of silt. The ship lies "turtle" or...  view photos
Lusitania is in terrible shape. She hit the bottom of the sea floor very hard, causing a break amidships. Further trouble has been caused by strong currents in the area, depth charging by the Royal Navy in World War II (mistaking Lusitania for a German...  view photos
Britannic was an Olympic-class ocean liner built in 1914 for the White Star Line at the Harland and Wolff Shipyards in Belfast, Northern Ireland originally called Gigantic. She was the sister ship to the Olympic and ill-fated Titanic. Due to being the...  view photos
The Dix lies on her starboard side, amazingly well intact despite being made of wood, albeit covered in local marine life. The wheel house and superstructure, often absent on wrecks of her type are still in place and highly recognizable, as is the...  view photos
Due to strong currents and the 200 foot plus depth of the wreck site, the City of Rio de Janeiro is likely a difficult dive which requires technical diving; specifically since it is at a depth greater than 130 feet. A 3D representation of the wreck...  view photos
As there is no current documentation regarding the current state of Clallam, only educated guesses can be made regarding the shape of the vessel by comparison to like shipwrecks. Clallam may have mostly rotted as the majority of her structure and hull was...  view photos
Diving Pacific would be impossible. It lies at over 900 feet below sea level, far too deep for even technical scuba diving. The wreck would need to be explored with an ROV or a manned submersible. While the position of the wreck has been confirmed by the...  view photos
The state of San Juan's wreck is unknown as no diving accounts or photographs exist online. Data from the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) shows the exact co-ordinates of the San Juan. At some point, the wreck was documented by...  view photos
The wreck of Valencia lies in very shallow waters and its remnants are highly visible to underwater divers as the sun's light still penetrates at her depth. Be warned that the same treacherous currents, sharp jagged rocks and pounding surf which killed...  view photos
The wreck of the Empress of Ireland is very large. However, years of strong currents, salvaging and deterioration have taken their toll. The twin funnels have long since rusted away, as has the ship's superstructure. The wreck is covered in marine life...  view photos

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Shipwrecks of Lake Ontario - A Journey of Discovery Book

The National Museum of the Great Lakes is excited to announce the release of a new book titled Shipwrecks of Lake Ontario: A Journey of Discovery. This book contains stories of long lost shipwrecks and the journeys of the underwater explorers who found them, written by Jim Kennard with paintings by Roland Stevens and underwater imagery by Roger Pawlowski.

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Legend of the Lake - New Discovery Edition Book

The recent discovery of the wreck of the British warship Ontario, “the Holy Grail” of Great Lakes shipwrecks, solves several mysteries that have puzzled historians since the ship sank more than two centuries ago. Now, for the first time, the whole tragic story of the Ontario can finally be told.

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